Get Out the Lime & Salt…It’s Time to Paint the Coop!

No, we’re not making margaritas (although that might be interesting)…We’re going to Whitewash the coop! When someone mentions whitewashing, a long wooden fence and kids toiling away at painting under the direction of the infamous Tom Sawyer is what usually comes to mind. However, traditional whitewashing has long been a standard for maintaining wooden structures…and fencing. Now, you may be asking, “What exactly is traditional whitewashing?” Unlike the modern trends of diluting white latex paint with water to get that “whitewash look” for furniture or interior surfaces, traditionally, whitewashing is done with a mixture of lime, salt, and water – specifically a combination of hydrated lime, a powder derived from limestone, and salt to improve adhesion mixed into water for application.

Lime is used in many applications from kitchen uses like pickling and preserving eggs to industrial & agricultural uses like mortar additive and soil amendment. For 100’s, if not 1,000’s of years, people have used a whitewash mixture to preserve, sanitize, and brighten up wood structures – especially on the farm. We have whitewashed several of our smaller chicken coop/hutches for a few years now, and we have been pleased with the results. Whitewashing provides antibacterial properties along with repellent properties.

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In this case, with a small hutch, it is easier to lay it on its side while whitewashing the inside. It’s so nice knowing that these nosey girls are perfectly safe getting all in the middle of it!

The best part? Whitewash is completely non-toxic for your animals – they can even lick it off the wall with no harm…Of course, there may be reason for concern with a chicken licking the wall, but that’s another issue…Plus, no heavy, fumes or off-gases to worry about – the chickens can come right back in the coop. Or, if they’re like ours, get right in the middle of it while you’re trying to paint.

There are a few downsides to using whitewash. The biggest problem is that it is water-soluble, so it will not work well for outside or an area that may get wet frequently. Another small problem is that it does rub or flake off over time. If you rub against a whitewashed wall, you’re likely to have white on your clothes or skin, but it does not stain and washes out easily. Unfortunately, this means that it has to be redone every year or so. However, it doesn’t take long to do during an annual “spring cleaning” of the coops and is really worth the little bit of extra work.

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Whitewashed Rooster Hutches: Here is a freshly whitewashed hutch drying in the sun. The white streaks are where the whitewash is mostly dry while the other areas are still wet. When it is fully dry, it will look like the temporarily-removed sides in the background.

There are lots of “recipes” online, and most call for 3:1 or 4:1 lime salt ratio mixed with approximately 1 gallon of water. You can review several links below for additional information about whitewashing, as well as the recipes used. Mama Mo frequently wings it on many things with “according to preference” directions; so for our first small projects of the spring (the small extra rooster hutches) we just dumped a cup or two of old pickling lime in a bucket, added water until it was a good consistency, and got to work. When we whitewash the large coops, we will add the salt and be a little more conscientious with amounts used.
We have ordered a large bag of hydrated lime in preparation for more spring cleaning as soon as the weather gets nice again…crazy Alabama weather.

Below is a photo of the dried whitewash interior of the Rooster Hutch. It dries much darker than it looks when it is being applied, so don’t let that discourage you from painting the whole thing!

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Here are several links to great resources regarding whitewashing:

We recommend a quality hydrated lime like First Saturday Lime: A Monthly Organic Pest Barrier – safe for kids, pets, and organic farming.

Wishing you all great spring cleaning success!



Some of the links on Mo’s Mini Farm pages are affiliate links, which means that if you decide to purchase a product through them we will receive a small commission. There is no extra cost to you! This helps us to keep the information on the website free of charge and to support our farm adventure. Because we value our integrity in recommending products, we only recommend products we have purchased and used. We may occasionally provide links to a product we are considering or planning to purchase, but we will always be sure to clearly state this fact. For more information about our affiliate relationships please see our Affiliates Disclosure Document.


When illness hits the entire house at the same time…

…the animals still need care. Here are a few tips on how we manage large numbers of poultry with minimal care. Plus, we provide some information about our experiences with using natural methods to treat illness in chickens…we weren’t the only ones sick this week.

This past week, the entire farm-house was down…food poisoning that hit us all within a few hours. Even when we are all attached to the bathroom &/or a trash can for 24+ hours and then moving at half pace for several more days, our 95 chickens, 23 ducks, 6 geese, and 6 guineas still need to be fed, watered, and turned-out/locked-up. Luckily, we had already implemented several ways to help ease the time commitments required to keep up with 10 different coops.20gal

Probably the best poultry accessories that we have to date are our custom-made 20 gallon watering buckets (right). What a lifesaver they were this week!

We have tried a few different kinds of waterers, but none have been as successful in keeping the water clean and the surrounding area dry. We highly recommend using these watering cups for your chickens, turkeys, guinea fowl, and other similar poultry. [We do not recommend as the only water source for waterfowl.]

We have also installed several different kinds of feeders in our coops with 10 or more birds. We have installed wall-mounted feeders (below) in two coops with the least floor space which have worked well. They are a little pricey, but worth it for us because they do hold a large amount. 20160903_162155

In our largest coop, we created a custom-built feeder (below) that fit the space and holds a full 50lb bag or more of layer pellet feed. To make sure the feed stays pest and moisture free, we converted a clear Ziploc Weather Shield storage tote into a feeder with a large pvc pipe feed dispenser. We do have to occasionally rake the pellets to the center to fall down the pipe, but it works great overall – sure beats having to haul a heavy feeder to the other side of the lot every 5-6 days! The foam seal around the tote keeps feed fresh and dry long enough for it to be consumed, and it’s easy to tell how much feed is left since it’s clear. We plan to make another similar feeder for another large coop in the coming weeks.

Unfortunately, last Saturday – the day before the house fell to illness – we had just started treating one of our hens in the coop with our oldest birds. Our 5-year-old white Marans, Snowball, was showing some respiratory congestion – very raspy, heavy breathing but no sneezing/coughing or mucus discharge, and quickly we pulled out all the stops in hopes making this a short and isolated problem. Saturday afternoon, Mama Mo applied VetRx to Snowball’s comb & wattles and under both wings. 20160903_162251

We also mixed up a special gallon of “medicated” water. We have had great success with Durvet’s DuraStat (right), a water-soluble combination of natural herbs like oregano. We normally don’t keep water inside the coop, but when we treat with the DuraStat, we leave it in the coop overnight – a good dose first thing in the morning seems to work quite well.

Additionally, late Saturday night, Mama Mo dosed Snowball with our own custom natural oils blend (below), and it’s a really good thing because this was the only treatments she received before we were all down for the count! We are happy to report that by the time we were able to get back out there to do more than open/close a coop door, she was fine.

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How do you handle being down and not able to take care of your livestock? We’d love to hear ways that help you get through the rough times.

Also, do you use natural methods to treat your chickens when they are ill? Tell us about your experiences!



Some of the links on Mo’s Mini Farm pages are affiliate links, which means that if you decide to purchase a product through them we will receive a small commission. There is no extra cost to you! This helps us to keep the information on the website free of charge and to support our farm adventure. Because we value our integrity in recommending products, we only recommend products we have purchased and used. We may occasionally provide links to a product we are considering or planning to purchase, but we will always be sure to clearly state this fact. For more information about our affiliate relationships please see our Affiliates Disclosure Document.


Do you date your eggs?

We do not refrigerate the farm fresh eggs, so at times – especially in spring – we have cartons and cartons of eggs sitting on the counters. To reduce the risk of accidentally sending old eggs to extended family or friends, we date our eggs each night after collecting them. Reusing cartons and consolidating eggs into fewer cartons cannot be done if you date the cartons, which means each individual egg must be dated. We started dating with a charcoal pencil which was easy enough, but when you collect 2-3 dozen, or more, eggs a night that can be quit time-consuming. Mama Mo began searching for alternatives…

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Simple office item makes poultry farming so much easier!

An easy and inexpensive solution was found through Amazon! A regular office date stamp with the year slot set to blank works great. We were concerned with stamping ink on the eggs, so we found an edible ink* to use and ensure food safety. The ink was a little pricey ($20 for a 4 oz bottle), but it lasts a long time in the un-inked pad that we bought. We’ve only re-inked it about 3 times in 1 1/2 years.  The stamp and pad were well under $10, so we spent less than $30.00 to tremendously speed up evening chores. You can have 2-3 dozen eggs individually dated in less than 5 minutes. Well worth it! Plus, the ink does not smudge or wipe off like the charcoal pencil did. In fact, we wash our eggs with lukewarm water right before use, and unless we scrub, it doesn’t even wash off then.

*Unfortunately, that particular ink is no longer available on Amazon, but there are numerous other edible inks for around the same price or maybe less.