Double-Yolk Eggs Could Mean Trouble

Earlier this week, we thought we had a broody hen already occupying our most popular nest box in a largest flock. 20170414_174255Splotchy had set up camp and was sending out her broody sounding warnings anytime another hen came around. She is the only EasterEgger hen in the flock and lays a nice blue egg, and she is also the hen who sneaked hatching three fuzzballs late last summer. She’s relatively young – just coming into lay last spring, so we thought she’s just going to be one of those broody-every-time-you-blink kind of hens. Since we are in no short supply of chickens right now and anything she might hatch would be a real barnyard mix, we were not real interested in letting her continue.

Shortly after the discovery, we could hear a very loud egg song coming from the coop. Mama Mo mentioned to Papa Mo that Splotchy was already broody for this season, to which he inquired if that was her making all the noise (he rarely hears the egg song since he’s typically left for work when the hens get moving for the day). We discussed since she was broody she shouldn’t be laying and went about our work repairing another chicken hutch.

Later in the afternoon, Mama Mo noticed she was out of the nest box and used that opportunity to collect any eggs before Splotchy had the chance to hatch anything. Surprise! There was a gigantic blue egg in the box! No wonder she was camped out in there for so long and making so much noise! Not surprisingly, it was a double-yolk egg that most likely resulted mainly from upset to the coop arrangement for that folk.

This mostly young flock was overwintered in a storage-building-turned-barn, and we are trying to finish it out as a permanent coop. Unfortunately, many of the young pullets have already started laying for the first time, and we are scrambling (no pun intended) to get nest boxes and such prepared for them, resulting in lots of confusion and disruption to regular laying right now.

Now, we tell this story to explain about double-yolk eggs. Many people think they are cool and some even brag that their hen lays double-yolk eggs all the time. We feel that, not only from the hen’s perspective (have you heard them yelling when laying those giant eggs??) but from a healthy chicken perspective, it could possibly not be such a good thing. And here is why: it means the hen’s reproductive tract could be stressed &/or injured.

An egg is produced when ovum/yolk is released into the oviduct to go through the cycle of forming the egg that is laid. About an hour+/- after an egg is laid, another mature yolk is released to start its cycle which takes approximately 25 hours to complete. The entire egg production cycle is a finely tuned process that can occasionally experience a “glitch”. If there is a glitch in the cycle, multiple things can result, such as more than one yolk being released causing a double-yolk egg to develop. This particular glitch in the egg production cycle is typically the result of hormonal change or imbalance as young hens are beginning to lay eggs or as an older hen’s typical egg production cycle slows down. It can also be hereditary, and some cultures in other countries breed for this trait.

The double-yolk phenomenon is typically harmless and produces perfectly edible eggs, but it does usually mean an extra-large egg which increases the risk of egg binding, vent prolapse (part of the oviduct protrudes from the vent) , or peritonitis (infection caused by yolks falling out of the reproductive tract). All of these can lead to death through injury &/or infection.

If your hen consistently produces abnormally large double-yolk eggs, she should be watched closely for any complications that could result from stressing or injuring the reproductive tract. Some hens that produce double-yolk eggs do so with normal size eggs (we suspect these are the hereditary cases) and are at far less risk of developing any complications.

Here are multiple articles discussing double-yolk eggs, egg production, and other associated problems:



 

Some of the links on Mo’s Mini Farm pages are affiliate links, which means that if you decide to purchase a product through them we will receive a small commission. There is no extra cost to you! This helps us to keep the information on the website free of charge and to support our farm adventure. Because we value our integrity in recommending products, we only recommend products we have purchased and used. We may occasionally provide links to a product we are considering or planning to purchase, but we will always be sure to clearly state this fact. For more information about our affiliate relationships please see our Affiliates Disclosure Document.


Get Out the Lime & Salt…It’s Time to Paint the Coop!

No, we’re not making margaritas (although that might be interesting)…We’re going to Whitewash the coop! When someone mentions whitewashing, a long wooden fence and kids toiling away at painting under the direction of the infamous Tom Sawyer is what usually comes to mind. However, traditional whitewashing has long been a standard for maintaining wooden structures…and fencing. Now, you may be asking, “What exactly is traditional whitewashing?” Unlike the modern trends of diluting white latex paint with water to get that “whitewash look” for furniture or interior surfaces, traditionally, whitewashing is done with a mixture of lime, salt, and water – specifically a combination of hydrated lime, a powder derived from limestone, and salt to improve adhesion mixed into water for application.

Lime is used in many applications from kitchen uses like pickling and preserving eggs to industrial & agricultural uses like mortar additive and soil amendment. For 100’s, if not 1,000’s of years, people have used a whitewash mixture to preserve, sanitize, and brighten up wood structures – especially on the farm. We have whitewashed several of our smaller chicken coop/hutches for a few years now, and we have been pleased with the results. Whitewashing provides antibacterial properties along with repellent properties.

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In this case, with a small hutch, it is easier to lay it on its side while whitewashing the inside. It’s so nice knowing that these nosey girls are perfectly safe getting all in the middle of it!

The best part? Whitewash is completely non-toxic for your animals – they can even lick it off the wall with no harm…Of course, there may be reason for concern with a chicken licking the wall, but that’s another issue…Plus, no heavy, fumes or off-gases to worry about – the chickens can come right back in the coop. Or, if they’re like ours, get right in the middle of it while you’re trying to paint.

There are a few downsides to using whitewash. The biggest problem is that it is water-soluble, so it will not work well for outside or an area that may get wet frequently. Another small problem is that it does rub or flake off over time. If you rub against a whitewashed wall, you’re likely to have white on your clothes or skin, but it does not stain and washes out easily. Unfortunately, this means that it has to be redone every year or so. However, it doesn’t take long to do during an annual “spring cleaning” of the coops and is really worth the little bit of extra work.

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Whitewashed Rooster Hutches: Here is a freshly whitewashed hutch drying in the sun. The white streaks are where the whitewash is mostly dry while the other areas are still wet. When it is fully dry, it will look like the temporarily-removed sides in the background.

There are lots of “recipes” online, and most call for 3:1 or 4:1 lime salt ratio mixed with approximately 1 gallon of water. You can review several links below for additional information about whitewashing, as well as the recipes used. Mama Mo frequently wings it on many things with “according to preference” directions; so for our first small projects of the spring (the small extra rooster hutches) we just dumped a cup or two of old pickling lime in a bucket, added water until it was a good consistency, and got to work. When we whitewash the large coops, we will add the salt and be a little more conscientious with amounts used.
We have ordered a large bag of hydrated lime in preparation for more spring cleaning as soon as the weather gets nice again…crazy Alabama weather.

Below is a photo of the dried whitewash interior of the Rooster Hutch. It dries much darker than it looks when it is being applied, so don’t let that discourage you from painting the whole thing!

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Here are several links to great resources regarding whitewashing:

We recommend a quality hydrated lime like First Saturday Lime: A Monthly Organic Pest Barrier – safe for kids, pets, and organic farming.

Wishing you all great spring cleaning success!



Some of the links on Mo’s Mini Farm pages are affiliate links, which means that if you decide to purchase a product through them we will receive a small commission. There is no extra cost to you! This helps us to keep the information on the website free of charge and to support our farm adventure. Because we value our integrity in recommending products, we only recommend products we have purchased and used. We may occasionally provide links to a product we are considering or planning to purchase, but we will always be sure to clearly state this fact. For more information about our affiliate relationships please see our Affiliates Disclosure Document.


“Mean” Roosters – Why We Keep Them Anyway

Our experience with aggressive roosters started just two years into our great chicken adventure. We ordered all pullets from a hatchery for our first chickens, but we quickly got the chicken bug and increased our numbers the very next spring with the purchase of our own incubator & fertile eggs. Of course, there is no way to sway the outcome of the sexes that hatch, and we were blessed with multiple roosters. Our Buff Orpington was a sweetheart, and a few FBC Marans were just fine. But, our two splash Ameraucana were feisty boys (aka little feathered turdballs). splash rooster

We began researching how to deal with aggressive roosters. The most common two solutions? (1) show him who’s boss or (2) get rid of him (mostly commonly by eating but rehoming was mentioned). We needed these two boys to breed BBS Ameraucana as we had planned, meaning (2) was not an option. We tried the “show him who’s boss” method which only resulted in making things worse. The dominant rooster drew blood when he flogged Little Mo in the shin, and regularly attacked Papa Mo. He also began to fight with the other rooster, and we ended up having to separate them. At this point, both were misbehaving. Luckily, Mama Mo was usually spared the worst attack attempts – boiling down to mostly just a stand-off with a few block/punts. Finally, we returned to the research of how to handle an aggressive rooster.

After much researching, we found more solid opinions when we began studying rooster behaviors, particularly in relation to a rooster’s position in a flock. A rooster’s job is to steadfastly defend his flock of hens from anything HE perceives as a threat. This can be anything that he thinks will harm him or his flock, but it can also be anything that he feels will challenge his dominance. We also found a wonderful tip from an ole’ timer who pointed out: Act like a rooster (challenging him) and expect to be treated like another rooster. So we set out with a new method…

We began picking him up and carrying him around whenever he challenged us – talking to him gently but firmly and petting him on the back of head to show we meant no harm. This got us to a point where he at least didn’t attack as soon as we opened the gate. We also found that our big clunky rubber boots were a big “No. No.” Even dark-colored pants received a different reaction. Remember, it’s whatever he perceives as a threat. We changed those things, along with always moving slowly and vocally announcing, “It’s just me,” while offering scratch treats. If he seemed to be readying to challenge/flog, Mama Mo always faced him, pointed her finger on his level and said “Behave” in a low, firm voice. Waving things around in the air above them and being loud only serves to agitate and provoke a defense response. It did take a little bit of time, during which time they also matured, but we ended up having two well-behaved roosters in the end.

On the maturing subject, it should also be noted that roosters have hormones just like people, and during their “teen years” as we call it (6 months to 1 year +/-), they are particularly gung-ho to pick a fight. They are young and trying to cement their position in a flock. Keep in mind that, with proper handling, they typically mellow when they feel settled in with their flock and understand your role as caretaker. However, as should be expected, each year when spring gets close and laying & breeding ramps up, we notice even our senior roosters being slightly less laid back toward us. After all, LOVE is in the air. We anticipate this and just give them a little extra room to deal with their short-lived spring fever, but really you should never completely take your eye off a rooster. It is a rooster.

Of course, even though we have not personally had this problem, there are always some that will just never learn to be nice. Those are the ones that you should dispatch to the stock pot (or whatever you prefer). Please don’t sell those types to anyone – even with full disclosure – because they don’t need to be bred, which is sure to happen at least once, even if not planned.

Lastly, our personal opinion on feisty roosters is that, within reason, that is what you want. A rooster’s main job is to protect his flock, and an overly laid-back rooster is not as likely to defend a hen being attacked or even keep his hens in order amongst themselves. We appreciate the role of roosters in our flocks – not only for producing cute little fuzzballs, but also for maintaining a proper balance within the flock. A good rooster will both tidbit (what is “tidbitting”?) and step in to stop hen squabbles and bring harmony to his little flock.

We see posts regularly about what to do with aggressive or mean roosters. We hope sharing our experience will help you learn how to best deal with your roosters productively for a great outcome for all involved.


Some of the links on Mo’s Mini Farm pages are affiliate links, which means that if you decide to purchase a product through them we will receive a small commission. There is no extra cost to you! This helps us to keep the information on the website free of charge and to support our farm adventure. Because we value our integrity in recommending products, we only recommend products we have purchased and used. We may occasionally provide links to a product we are considering or planning to purchase, but we will always be sure to clearly state this fact. For more information about our affiliate relationships please see our Affiliates Disclosure Document.